THE AMERICA ONE NEWS
Jun 20, 2024  |  
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Jose Nino


NextImg:64% Of American Voters Want the US to Recognize Taiwan’s Independence

The majority of American voters overwhelmingly want the United States government to recognize Taiwan’s independence from the People’s Republic of China.

According to a recent Rasmussen poll, 64% of likely US voters believe the UE should officially recognize Taiwan as an independent nation, politically separate from China. Just 14% are against the US’s recognition of Taiwanese independence, while an additional 22% are unsure.

Blinken was criticized last week after he met in Beijing with Chinese President Xi Jinping and told reporters the U.S. “does not support Taiwan independence.”

 62% of Democrats, 71% of Republican voters  and 58% of  independent voters support the US recognizing Taiwan’s independence. Just 13% of Democrat voters, 11% of Republican voters, and 17% of independent voters oppose the US’s recognition of an independent Taiwan.

Generally speaking, voters aren’t impressed with President Joe Biden’s China foreign policy. Only 34% gave Biden a good or excellent rating for the way he has  handled issues connected  to China, whereas 48% gave Biden  poor marks on China policy.

The majority of voters predict a Chinese invasion of Taiwan in the near future. However, their views are considerably more divided over a prospective US military response to a Chinese invasion of Taiwan.  71% believe that it’s likely China will invade Taiwan in the next few years, which includes 32% who view a Chinese invasion as very likely. Just 17% don’t believe it is likely China will launch an invasion against Taiwan in the next few years, while 13% are unsure. 

37% of voters indicated that the US should use military force to defend Taiwan against a Chinese invasion, while 31% are against the US military defending Taiwan and 32% are unsure.

Independent voters tend to be more opposed than either Democrats or Republicans to using American military forces to defend Taiwan from a Chinese invasion. 42% of Republican voters and 40% of Democrat voters, but only 29% of independent  voters, believe the US should use military force to defend Taiwan against a Chinese invasion.  30% of Republican voters, 29% of Democrats voters and 33% of independent voters don’t believe the US military should defend Taiwan.

As for political categories, 80% of Republican voters, and 66% of both Democratic voters and independent voters believe that it’s likely China will invade Taiwan in the near future. 42% of Republican voters, 24% of Democratic voters or 29% of independent voters believe such an invasion is very likely.

As for race, 63% of white voters, 61% of black voters and 69% of other non-black minority voters support the US recognizing an independent Taiwan. The way Biden has handled China connected issues is rated good or excellent by 35% of white voters, 44% of black voters, and 28% of other non-black minorities. 39% of white voters, 30% of black voters or 34% of other non-black minorities believe the US should use military force to defend Taiwan from a Chinese invasion.

In terms of income earners, 45% of individuals making over $200,000 annually support the US using military force to defend Taiwan against a Chinese invasion. By contrast, only 32% of individuals making $30,000 agree with this sentiment. 

In an ideal world, Taiwan would be an independent, sovereign nation. However, the world of geopolitics is rough. At the end of the day, US foreign policy should serve to advance American interests. 

To be sure, halting immigration from China — a tool by the Chinese government to conduct mass espionage and theft of trade secrets — and trade with it are very much in the US interest.

But getting into a conflict with a nuclear power over Taiwan is simply a bridge too far. Hopefully, policymakers can come to their senses here and recognize that military intervention is not a viable option.